How Much Do Psychologists Make?

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Psychologist Salary

According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, psychologists can earn between $41,900 and $122,000 each year. The average salary for psychologists is about $75,300 which is 103% higher than the national average salary of all occupations ($37,040).

State by State Psychologist Salaries

Below you’ll find a map of psychologists average salaries by state. Hover over your state to see the current average salary.


What You Should Know About Psychologist Salaries

Factors That Determine a Psychologists Salary

These are the main factors that influence a psychologists salary:

  • Education attatainment
  • Experience and training in the field
  • Location of practice
  • Field of psychology and current demand

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Psychologist Salaries by Career Field

Now that we know the contributing factors of a psychologist’s salary, let’s break down each career field of psychology and talk about its specific salary, job roles and responsibilities, professions within that field of psychology, education and training requirements, work settings, and the highest paying industries and locations.

Find out more about Clinical Psychologists, School Psychologists, Forensic Psychologists, Sports Psychology and more, below.


Clinical Psychologist

How Much Do Clinical Psychologists Make?

National Average Salary
BLS.gov: $76,040 per year
Glassdoor.com: $79,743 per year
Payscale.com: $74,099 per year

As is the case with other psychology professions, experience greatly influences how much a clinical psychologist can earn. Newly practicing clinical psychologists can expect to earn about $50,000 per year, where more experienced psychologists can earn up to $100,000 per year.

What Clinical Psychologists Do

Clinical psychology is one of the largest and most popular branches of psychology. Clinical psychologists assess, diagnose, prevent and treat a variety of emotional, behavioral, mental disorders and illnesses through individual, child, family, and group therapies. According to the APA, clinical psychologists, “use the science of psychology to treat complex human problems and promote change.”

Clinical Psychologist Professions

Some examples of psychiatrist professions include Research Psychologist, Health Service Psychologist, Counselor, and School Psychologist.

Education and Training Requirements

The minimum requirement for becoming a licensed practicing clinical psychologist in most states is a doctorate degree in psychology. Clinical psychologists must also complete a supervised post-graduate residency program and pass a state-licensing exam.

Where Do Clinical Psychologists Work?

Clinical psychologists work in research centers, universities and colleges, government organizations, education institutions, hospitals, medical clinics, mental health facilities, and private practices.

Highest Paying Industries for Clinical Psychologists

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, these industries have the highest median annual wages for Clinical Psychologists:

  • Child Day Care Services – $106,510
  • Specialty (Except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals) – $90,980
  • General Medical and Surgical Hospitals – $84,020
  • Offices of Physicians – $83,310
  • Offices of Other Health Practitioners – $83,230
  • Educational Support Services – $75,480
  • Elementary and Secondary Schools – $74,130

Best States for Clinical Psychologists

Based on Salary

  • District of Columbia – $90,690
  • New Jersey – $90,520
  • Connecticut – $89,240
  • New York – $86,820
  • California – $96,310

Based on Highest Employment Level

  • California
  • New York
  • Texas
  • Pennsylvania
  • Massachusetts

Resources for Clinical Psychologists


Psychiatrist

How Much Do Psychiatrists Make?

National Average Salary
BLS.gov: $193,680 per year
Glassdoor.com: $190,054 per year
Payscale.com: $109,000 per year

While most psychiatrists earn a considerable amount, salaries will vary depending on the area of specialization and level of experience. For example, a psychiatrist working in a medical office with a few years of experience may earn roughly $150,000 per year, while a veteran psychiatrist working in an outpatient care center can make over $200,000 per year.

What Psychiatrists Do

Psychiatrists are medical doctors (have completed an M.D. or D.O. program) who diagnose, treat, and seek to prevent mental, behavioral, and emotional disorders based on the APA’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Psychiatrists help those who have sudden problems like extreme anxiety, hallucinations, and thoughts of suicide. They also treat those with more long-term problems that affect the daily functioning of the individual, such as experiencing overwhelming feelings of anxiousness, hopelessness, or sadness. Because of their medical training, psychiatrists are able to perform a full range of psychological and medical testing to help create a picture of their patient’s mental and physical state.

Psychiatrist Professions

Some examples of psychiatrist professions include Addiction Psychiatrist, Geriatric Psychiatrist, and Neuropsychiatrist.

Education and Training Requirements

If you have what it takes to become a psychiatrist it may just well be worth it. A psychiatrist is one of the highest paying jobs in psychology. But big bucks don’t come without a big price. To become a psychiatrist, you’ll need eight years of post-undergraduate schooling. In addition to a bachelor’s degree, psychiatrists are required to complete medical school (either an M.D. or D.O. program) as well as a four-year residency program.

Where Do Psychiatrists Work?

Some of the more popular work settings for psychologists include clinics, psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals, community agencies, private practices, university medical centers, emergency rooms, nursing homes, courts and prisons, rehabilitation centers, military settings, and more. According to the American Psychiatric Association, “about half of the psychiatrists in the U.S. maintain private practices and many psychiatrists work in multiple settings.”

Highest Paying Industries for Psychiatrists

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, these industries have the highest median annual wages for psychiatrists:

  • Home Health Services – $216,730
  • State Government (OES Designation) – $201,520
  • Community Food and Housing, and Emergency and Other Relief Services – $197,030
  • Individual and Family Services – $197,030
  • Outpatient Care Centers – $196,820

Best States for Psychiatrists

Based on Salary

  • Wyoming – $260,820
  • Alaska – $242,480
  • Indiana – $229,980
  • Mississippi – $229,060
  • Alabama – $228,850

Based on Highest Employment Level

  • California
  • New York
  • Texas
  • Ohio
  • Illinois

Resources for Psychiatrists


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industrial-organizational psychologist interviewing employee

Industrial-Organizational Psychologist

How Much Do Industrial-Organizational Psychologists Make?

National Average Salary
BLS.gov: $98,800 per year
Glassdoor.com: $73,595 per year
Payscale.com: $72,000 per year

What Industrial-Organizational Psychologists Do

Industrial-organizational psychologists learn and apply psychology principles to HR, management, administration, sales, and marketing problems. They work to improve the quality of life, work setting, and production of employees and even administration. They can be involved in an organization’s policy planning, training, development, organizational analysis and development, and employee testing and interviewing.

Industrial-Organizational Psychologist Professions

In addition to being an Industrial-Organizational Psychologist, those with an industrial-organizational degree can work as a Research Psychologist, Compensation Analyst, Human Capital Research Specialist, Organizational Psychologist, Social Scientist, Operational Psychologist, and a Selection and Assessment Psychologist.

Education and Training Requirements

Since industrial-organizational psychologists don’t practice psychology in a counseling or therapy setting, they aren’t typically required to be licensed as a psychologist. Consequently, they aren’t required to earn a doctorate degree, although most do anyway. While a master’s degree will suffice for this career, a doctorate degree offers industrial-organizational psychologists greater career advancement opportunity and earning potential.

Where Do Industrial-Organizational Psychologists Work?

Industrial-organizational psychologists work with corporations and businesses to help improve workplace performance. Some of their primary responsibilities include improving the productivity of employees and teams, developing market research surveys and identifying which workers are best suited for particular positions. While the average beginning salary for industrial-organizational psychologists with a master’s degree is about $50,000, experienced industrial-organizational psychologists with a doctorate degree can earn up to $250,000 per year. These salary figures make an industrial-organizational psychologist occupation work one of the top paying psychology jobs.

Highest Paying Industries for Industrial-Organizational Psychologists

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, these industries have the highest median annual wages for Industrial-organizational psychologists:

  • Scientific Research and Development Services – $123,290
  • Management of Companies and Enterprises – $122,6300
  • Architectural, Engineer, and Related Services – $112,400
  • Management, Scientific, and Technical Consulting Services – $98,600
  • State Government (OES Designation) – $78,340

Best States for Industrial-Organizational Psychologists

Based on Salary

  • Virginia – $120,260
  • Pennsylvania – $112,200
  • New Jersey – $110,410
  • Massachusetts – $84,550
  • Florida – $76,780

Based on Highest Employment Level

  • Massachusetts
  • Pennsylvania
  • Ohio
  • California

Resources for Industrial-Organizational Psychologists


Neuropsychologist

How Much Do Neuropsychologists Make?

National Average Salary
BLS.gov: $94,590 per year
Glassdoor.com: not enough data
Payscale.com: $90,000 per year

What Neuropsychologists Do

Neuropsychologists are cognitive scientists that specialize in the study of brain function and processes. They perform various tasks including the treatment of brain injury, brain disease, study of the nervous system, analysis of the effects of substances and behaviors on the brain, preparing scientific reports or presentations, conduct research, write clinical neuropsychological reports from gathered data and observations, assess patient intelligence, attention, concentration, sensorimotor function, language, learning, memory, and academic ability, and diagnose psychological or neural disorders.

Neuropsychology Professions

Typical neuropsychology professions include Clinical Neuropsychologist, Neuropsychologist, Neuropsychology Service Director, Pediatric Neuropsychologist, and Professor of Neuropsychology.

Education and Training Requirements

The minimum requirement to become a neuropsychologist is a doctorate degree in neuropsychology (or clinical neuropsychology) and post-doctoral training. Most neuropsychology professions also require licensing through the state in which you want to practice.

Where Do They Work?

Neuropsychologists work in a variety of settings including hospitals and medical centers, research facilities, health clinics, laboratories and colleges and universities.

Resources for Neuropsychologists


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Engineering Psychologist

How Much Do Engineering Psychologists Make?

National Average Salary
BLS.gov: $81,550 per year
Glassdoor.com: not enough data
Payscale.com: $82,610 per year

What Engineering Psychologists Do

The main goal of engineering psychologists is to help design facilities, environments, technologies, equipment, and objects to improve human well-being, productivity, and use, improve operational and system efficiency, and decrease the risk of injury. They do this through analyzing human behavior and overlaying it with already known theories, principles, and research data. According to Ricardo Prada, an engineering psychology student from George Mason University, the purpose of engineering psychology “is to deliberately make someone’s life better.”

Engineering Psychologist Professions

Human Factors Engineers and Ergonomist, Consultant in Ergonomics and Safety, and Human Factors Advisor.

Education and Training Requirements

Although many positions are available for those with a master’s in engineering psychology, most engineering psychologists today possess a doctorate degree in engineering psychology. Not only do those with a PhD have more of a say over the projects they work on, they also earn the highest annual salaries over those with a master’s; $92,614-$111,368 compared to $75,150-$90,500. Additionally, academic and some government positions require a PhD for employment consideration.

Where Do They Work?

Engineering Psychologists work in corporations, hospitals, colleges and universities, and also as private consultants.

Highest Paying Industries for Engineering Psychologist

If you want to maximize your earning potential as an engineering psychologist you’ll need to pick the right position and industry to work in as salaries for engineering psychologists can vary drastically from one industry to the next. According to the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the highest paying industries for human factors and engineering psychologists are for-profit businesses, government, with academia following behind. Additionally, private consultants, especially those with a doctoral degree, earn the highest salaries.

Resources for Engineering Psychologists



counseling psychologist running a group session

Counseling Psychologist

How Much Do Counseling Psychologists Make?

National Average Salary

BLS.gov: $73,520 per year
Glassdoor.com: $63,251 per year
Payscale.com: not enough data

What Counseling Psychologists Do

Like clinical psychology professionals, counseling psychologists provide a variety of mental health services including psychotherapy. However, unlike clinical psychologists, counseling psychologists generally treat patients with more mild forms of mental illness and/or behavioral disorders. Counseling psychologists listen to patients’ concerns and give them thinking and behavioral modification techniques to improve problem-solving, stress management, adjusting to life changes, careers, and relationships. They are also interested in helping patients to recognize and prevent their patient’s major social, mental, or physical disorders before they become unmanageable.

Counseling Psychologist Professions

Counseling psychologists can work in a variety of professions. The most common professions include Mental Health Counselor, Marriage and Family Counselor, Substance Abuse or Behavioral Disorder Counselor, and Social Worker.

Education and Training Requirements

A doctoral degree (PsyD, EdD or PhD) is required to practice as a counseling psychologist. Counseling psychologists will need to complete a set amount of observation hours under a licensed supervising psychologist and any licensing tests required by the state in which they choose to practice.

Where Do They Work?

Counseling psychologists typically work in group or private practices, substance abuse treatment or addiction rehab centers, hospitals and medical clinics, community centers, health centers, and colleges and universities.

Highest Paying Industries for Counseling Psychologist

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, these industries have the highest median annual wages for Counseling Psychologists:

  • Child Day Care Services – $106,510
  • Specialty (except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals) – $90,980
  • General Medical and Surgical Hospitals – $84,020
  • Offices of Physicians – $83,310
  • Offices of Other Health Practitioners – $83,230
  • Educational Support Services – $75,480
  • Elementary and Secondary Schools – $74,130

Best States for Counseling Psychologists

Based on Salary

  • District of Columbia – $90,690
  • New Jersey – $90,520
  • Connecticut – $89,240
  • New York – $86,820
  • California – $96,310

Based on Highest Employment Level

  • California
  • New York
  • Texas
  • Pennsylvania
  • Massachusetts

Resources for Counseling Psychologists


Forensic Psychologist

How Much Do Forensic Psychologists Make?

National Average Salary
BLS.gov: $60,430 per year
Glassdoor.com: not enough data
Payscale.com: $61,469 per year

What Forensic Psychologists Do

Forensic psychologists focus on psychological issues relating to family, civil, or criminal cases. Just a few of their responsibilities include serving as expert witnesses for legal defense and prosecution teams, developing psychological profiles of criminals, determining threat assessments and competency of persons, prepping witnesses to testify in court, training law enforcement professionals, dealing with cases relating to child custody and child abuse.

Education and Training Requirements

Those pursuing a career in forensic psychology come from a variety of educational backgrounds. However, as most states only license forensic psychologists who hold a doctorate degree, you should plan to earn a PhD or PysD. Forensic psychologists typically have a doctorate degree in forensic, clinical, or counseling psychology. Forensic psychologists also must complete the equivalent of two years of sequential and supervised professional experience, one year needs to include an APA- or CAP-accredited predoctoral internship.

Where Do They Work?

Forensic psychologists work in court or legal settings. They can work for government organizations, public or private practices, or as a consultant.

Resources for Forensic Psychologists


School Psychologist

How Much Do School Psychologists Make?

National Average Salary
BLS.gov: $58,740 per year
Glassdoor.com: $61,827 per year
Payscale.com: $58,000 per year

What School Psychologists Do

School psychologists often work in cooperation with other education professionals in an effort to diagnose and treat learning problems and behavioral disorders in school age children. Their overall goal is to help children overcome emotional, behavioral, social, and academic problems so that they can develop normally and have a productive academic learning experience.

School Psychologists Professions

Commonly reported job titles for school psychologists include Bilingual School Psychologist, Child Study Team Director, Early Intervention School Psychologist, School Psychologist, and Consulting Psychologist.

Education and Training Requirements

The minimum requirement to become a school psychologist in most states is a master’s or Ed.S. degree. However, more and more school psychologists are earning doctorate degrees in psychology (PhD, PsyD or EdD). In addition to an advanced degree, many schools also require the completion of a 60-credit school psychology specialist program.

Where Do They Work?

Most school psychologists work in a school setting as they work very closely with education professionals and administration.

Highest Paying Industries for School Psychologists

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, these industries have the highest median annual wages for School Psychologist:

  • Child Day Care Services – $106,510
  • Specialty (except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals) – $90,980
  • General Medical and Surgical Hospitals – $84,020
  • Offices of Physicians – $83,310
  • Offices of Other Health Practitioners – $83,230
  • Educational Support Services – $75,480
  • Elementary and Secondary Schools – $74,130

Best States for School Psychologists

Based on Salary

  • District of Columbia – $90,690
  • New Jersey – $90,520
  • Connecticut – $89,240
  • New York – $86,820
  • California – $96,310

Based on Highest Employment Level

  • California
  • New York
  • Texas
  • Pennsylvania
  • Massachusetts

Resources for School Psychologists


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Sports and Performance Psychologists

How Much Do Sports and Performance Psychologists Make?

National Average Salary
BLS.gov: $57,000 per year
Glassdoor.com: not enough data
Payscale.com: not enough data

The demand for sports and performance psychologists is growing, and so is the pay level. Starting salaries in this branch of psychology are roughly $45,000 year. However, experienced and successful psychologists who work with professionals can earn upwards of $100,000 per year.

What Sports and Performance Psychologists Do

As the name suggests, sports and performance psychologists deal with the psychological aspects of athletics and professionals. These psychologists frequently focus on finding ways to motivate athletes and professionals to improve their output by helping them to maintain a positive mental attitude. They help athletes and professionals enhance performance, cope with pressures of competition and job stress, recover from injuries or failures, and improve overall enjoyment of their sport or profession.

Education and Training Requirements

To become a sports psychologist you’ll need a graduate degree (preferably a doctorate degree) in sports psychology or a related field such as counseling or clinical psychology. While this is not the most lucrative job in psychology, it is certainly a field with a lot of opportunities.

Where Do They Work?

Most sports psychologists work publicly or privately with professional athletic organizations and businesses, non-sports performance industries, businesses, medical hospitals, and high-risk groups like military, firefighters, and police. They can also work as private sports psychologist consultants to individual athletes or professionals.

Resources for Sports and Performance Psychologists

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